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Course Descriptions

English Department

Students are required to pass four consecutive years of English to graduate.

English 9
This course covers basic literary elements, a broad survey of literature from classical to contemporary, different literary genres, and composition. Students will strengthen writing skills, primarily working on autobiographical, analytical, and persuasive essays. Emphasis will be placed on writing as a process and in developing a strong voice and perspective in their writing. Students learn to outline, edit, and revise.

English 10
This course covers basic literary elements, a broad survey of literature from classical to contemporary, different literary genres, and composition. Students will gain a more complex understanding of metaphor, allegory, symbol, irony, and allusion. There is a strong emphasis on poetry.

English 10 Honors
This course covers the same material as English 10, plus a stronger emphasis is placed upon literary analysis skills—especially in poetry. Students are expected to be able to recognize and discuss more subtle and complex meanings in the literature. They should have mastered basic writing skills. The reading requirements are more rigorous. Teacher recommendation and satisfactory completion of summer homework is required for enrollment in this class. Additional books are covered in this course.

English 11
This course is a comprehensive survey of American literature from a Christian perspective. The survey is chronological, with literature divided into four major time periods. The writing emphasis is on narrative, literary analysis, and reflective compositions. Students study the political and social influences of each time period. They employ MLA standards for documentation and presentation.

AP English Language 
This junior-level course is approved for AP status by the College Board. Students in this introductory college-level course read and carefully analyze a broad and challenging range of nonfiction prose selections, deepening their awareness of rhetoric and how language works. Through close reading and frequent writing, students develop their ability to work with language and text with a greater awareness of purpose and strategy, while strengthening their own composing abilities. Course readings feature expository, analytical, personal, persuasive, and argumentative texts from a variety of authors and historical contexts Teacher recommendation and satisfactory completion of summer homework is required for enrollment in this class. Students who pass the AP exam may earn credit for their freshman year in college.

English 12
This is a comprehensive chronological survey of British literature and a sampling of European literature. Students learn to evaluate a work’s literary artistry and consider the social and historical values it reflects and embodies. In composition, the focus is on literary analysis, reflective, and business writing. Students are required to do multimedia presentations in class.

AP English Literature and Composition
This senior-level course is approved for AP status by the College Board. First semester is a broad survey of literary genres with extensive readings in short stories, poetry, and drama. Second semester focuses on literary novels and some additional poetry analysis. Teacher recommendation and satisfactory completion of summer homework is required for enrollment in this class. Students who pass the AP exam may earn credit for their freshman year in college.

Science Department

Students are required to pass two years of science to graduate.

Physical and Earth Science
This freshman-level course is intended to give students the mathematic and scientific foundation from which to interpret the everyday, physical world around them. First semester is primarily dedicated to physics concepts with a heavy emphasis on determining and evaluating the relationships among physical properties like mass, time, volume, etc.  Students will also engage very basic chemistry ideas to help bridge concepts between both terms.  The second semester focuses on concepts that expound on the physics but with an application towards the natural world around them, namely via the disciplines of geology, astronomy, and meteorology.

Biology
This course is required for all students to graduate. They must have successfully passed Algebra I. This is a life science course.

Chemistry
Algebra I is a prerequisite.  This is an introductory course in chemistry.  Students will participate in labs using mostly everyday chemicals to understand basic principles of how electrons govern the way matter combines and rearranges itself at the atomic scale.  This course follows physical chemistry all the way through a basic primer on organic chemistry.  Students must purchase the calculator designated by the teacher for this class.

AP Chemistry
This course is approved for AP status by the College Board. Algebra II and Chemistry are prerequisites.  This course will enable students to take an entire year’s worth of college-level chemistry content and so is designed – both by the College Board’s AP program and Upland Christian Academy – as a second-year high school course.  Some topics covered will be either significantly more in-depth than or foreign to a regular high school chemistry class.  Students must purchase the calculator designated by the teacher for this class. Teacher recommendation and satisfactory completion of summer homework is required for enrollment in this class. Students who pass the AP exam may earn credit for their freshman year in college.

Anatomy and Physiology
This is a life science course.

AP Biology 
This course is approved for AP status by the College Board. It requires intensive studying and homework. Teacher recommendation and satisfactory completion of summer homework is required for enrollment in this class. Students who pass the AP exam may earn credit for their freshman year in college.

AP Physics
This course is approved for AP status by the College Board. Algebra II is a prerequisite.  AP Physics is a college-level course in the discipline of physics.  Whether 1, 2, C: mechanics or C: electricity and magnetism is taught will depend on student demand.  Currently, AP Physics 1 is the most popular.  Students must purchase the calculator designated by the teacher for this class. Teacher recommendation and satisfactory completion of summer homework is required for enrollment in this class. Students who pass the AP exam may earn credit for their freshman year in college.

Math Department

Students are required to pass three years of math to graduate.

Accounting
In this course, students with no prior training learn fundamental accounting skills, building an appreciation for the role of accounting in managing a profitable business. They are given an overview of financial, cost, and management accounting; learn the basic concepts, conventions and rules of the double entry system; and practice techniques to analyze ratios from the balance sheet. The concepts of ethics, integrity, and confidentiality are woven in throughout the course. Student complete this course with the skills needed for college accounting courses—essential for Business majors—office work, or managing their own small businesses.

Algebra I
Students work with relations and functions. They look at how to graph, solve, and apply to the world around them.

Geometry
Students work with shapes and foundational mathematical postulates. They look at how to prove true statements, how shapes influence each other in different structures, and how to use the postulates to solve problems.

Algebra II
Students work with many different functions. They look at how to graph, solve, and apply to the world around them.

Pre-Calculus
Students work with higher level mathematics. They look extensively into trigonometric functions. They look at how to graph, solve, and apply to the world around them. This class will also introduce Calculus to prepare students for the next course, AP Calculus.  Students must purchase the calculator designated by the teacher for this class (Texas Instrument T89—the same calculator used for AP Calculus). Students must have successfully passed Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II to take this class.

Honors Pre-Calculus
(course description coming soon)

Advanced Placement Calculus AB
This course is approved for AP status by the College Board. Students must have successfully passed Honors Pre-Calculus to take this class. Students work with slope and area of curves. They look into how those two ideas interact with each other through graphing, solving, and applying to the world around them. This class will require intensive study and homework time. Students must have the Texas Instrument T89 calculator. Teacher recommendation and satisfactory completion of summer homework is required for enrollment in this class. Students who pass the AP exam may earn credit for their freshman year in college.

Social Studies Department

Students are required to pass three years of social studies classes to graduate.

World History 
This 10th grade class covers the Age of Exploration to the 20th century.

AP World History
This 10th grade course is approved for AP status by the College Board. The AP World History course focuses on developing students’ understanding of world history from approximately 8000 BCE to the present. This college-level course has students investigate the content of world history for significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in six historical periods, and develop and use the same thinking skills and methods (analyzing primary and secondary sources, making historical comparisons, chronological reasoning, and argumentation) employed by historians when they study the past. The course also provides five themes (interaction between humans and the environment; development and interaction of cultures; state building, expansion, and conflict; creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems; development and transformation of social structures) that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places encompassing the five major geographical regions of the globe: Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania. Teacher recommendation and satisfactory completion of summer homework is required for enrollment in this class. Students who pass the AP exam may earn credit for their freshman year in college.

U.S. History
This 11th grade class is a chronological survey of the United States from Reconstruction to the present day.

AP U.S. History
This course is approved for AP status by the College Board. Advanced Placement United States History (APUSH) surveys the history of the United States beginning with the pre-Columbian era and ending with international affairs and domestic events in the post-1945 period to the 1990s.  The course is designed to provide a comprehensive overview of the political, economic, social, and diplomatic trends and themes in United States history.  Some attention is given to historiography and more to the analysis and interpretation of historical documents.  The course also focuses on providing students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the events, people, trends, and themes in U.S. history. Teacher recommendation and satisfactory completion of summer homework is required for enrollment in this class. Students who pass the AP exam may earn credit for their freshman year in college.

Government
This senior-level, semester-long introductory class helps students understanding our federal government.

Economics
This introductory semester-long class for seniors covers the basics of micro and macroeconomics.

AP U.S. Government
This course is approved for AP status by the College Board. The main purpose of this course is to prepare students for the AP Exam in U.S. Government and Politics. Another important purpose is to give students a number of current and historical examples to relate the course material to.  The main areas of study in the course are aligned to the AP test: The Constitution and its underpinnings, political parties, interest groups, the media, Institutions of American Government, public policy, political behaviors and beliefs, and civil rights and liberties. Teacher recommendation and satisfactory completion of summer homework is required for enrollment in this class. Students who pass the AP exam may earn credit for their freshman year in college.

Bible Department

UCA requires all students to take Bible each year they are enrolled at our school. If a student earns an “F” in any semester of Bible, he or she will be placed on probation. If the student fails any subsequent semester of Bible, he/she may be asked to withdraw from UCA or re-take the Bible course.

Bible 9: Bible Survey and Christian Ethics
In order to prepare students for a thoughtful and impactful life of faith, this year-long course will lay a foundation for students in their understanding of the Bible and ethics.  First, to lay the groundwork, students will be informed about the origins and reliability of the Bible and cover an overview of biblical content in all of the different books, genres, sections, and themes across both the Hebrew Bible and New Testament.  Having laid the foundation of Biblical literature, students will then examine a number of cultural-ethical topics and issues that face followers of Christ in their contemporary setting.

Bible 10: Biblical Metanarrative and Life of Christ
The entirety of Biblical literature attests to a single Grand Story (or metanarrative) that initiates at the beginning of creation in Genesis 1, and finds its resolution at the conclusion of all things in Revelation 22.  At the center of this Grand Story is the climax, where God Himself puts into the flesh and blood of a poor Jewish Rabbi, Jesus of Nazareth, who lives a beautifully world-changing life, experiences an enigmatic death, and shocks the world with a powerful resurrection. In this year-long course, students will hone their skills in tracing the biblical metanarrative from the beginning, to Jesus, to our current situation, and on through to the end of the story.  Since Christ marks the pivotal point in the story, students will spend a significant share of the class investigating the credibility of the Gospel accounts and the content of the life of Christ.

Bible 11: Romans and Revelation
Following the events of Jesus’ life, death, and resurrection, His disciples and the early community of faith wrestled with the implications of those realities. In Paul’s epistle to the Romans, we have a clear presentation of the theology, philosophy, and Christian living practices of the early Christian community. Furthermore, John’s Apocalypse (the book of Revelation), presents modern readers a window into an ancient genre that speaks to the realities of persecution, faithfulness, and empire. This year-long course is a study dedicated to unpacking the rich truths found in these two texts by analyzing the cultural and historical context surrounding ancient Rome, Palestine, and Asia Minor. In doing so, students will then be equipped to wrestle with these same concepts, struggles, and realities that face them in their own contemporary context.

Bible 12L: Love, Dating, and Marriage
This semester-long course will center on God’s views on Love, Dating, and Marriage. Christian love at its core grows out as a reflection of God’s love. Thus, love and Christian action should be the natural outworking of knowing more about Jesus and his love for others. This course will first provide a philosophical and ethical framework for students to approach the topics of love, dating, and marriage. Considering the biblical witness and Christian traditions in the area of romance, students will learn to think critically about relationships, and practically apply content covered in the class.

Bible 12W: Worldview
Ever since Marshall McLuhan first coined the term “global village,” the truth of this short phrase has only grown in its applicability to the modern world. As students interact with their global neighbors in real life and on various media, the need to understand their own worldview and the worldview of others becomes increasingly essential. This semester-long course solidifies the students’ understanding of the Christian worldview, and also explores the cultures, philosophies, and religions with which the students will inevitably have contact. Worldviews are discussed and analyzed in media, and students are then equipped to  express missionally the Gospel in each of these contexts.

Acts 29
(course description coming soon)

Fine Arts Department

Students are required to pass one year of a visual or performing art class to graduate.

Choir
This class places a strong emphasis on performance. Students’ grades are closely tied to attendance in class and performances. Students must also purchase a performance outfit. This class is open to all students but requires teacher approval. This class may be repeated for elective credit.

Art I
This class is introductory art appreciation and student project oriented. Students may need to purchase additional necessary materials for projects.

Art II
This class requires teacher approval and the successful completion of Art I. There is a strong emphasis on art appreciation/analysis and student projects.

Art III
This class requires teacher approval and the successful completion of Art I and II. It is designed for the self-directed student who is looking to develop style and content, and gain experience in a wider variety of artistic processes. Students are expected to already have a strong foundation in the elements and principles of design.

AP Art
(course description coming soon)

Ensemble (Beyond the Cross)
This class is for our performing vocal group and is by teacher selection only. All interested students must audition with the Coordinator of Visual and Performing Arts in the spring. Students must be able to participate in a rigorous performance schedule and purchase performance outfits.

Yearbook
This yearbook staff is selected in the spring through an application and interview process by the teacher. Students must be able to work independently and attend various extracurricular events to cover them for the yearbook. Students must be able to work late if necessary to meet all deadlines. Basic computer skills are required.

World Languages Department

Students are required to pass two years of foreign language to graduate.

Spanish I and Spanish II
These courses focus on developing fluency in reading, writing, listening, and speaking in the Spanish language. The goal of these courses is for students to be able to have a variety of conversations at the beginner and intermediate levels. Each class is one full year.

Spanish II Honors
This course focuses on developing language skills at a more academic level with an emphasis on grammar instruction in addition to the skills learned in the regular Spanish II course.

Spanish III
This class emphasizes language, culture, traditions, and arts throughout the Spanish speaking world. Students are expected to be proficient in their verbal and writing skills so that their prior cultural and linguistic knowledge can be built upon to produce essays, speeches, conversations, and presentations in Spanish.

Spanish IV and Spanish IV Honors
This course focuses on the progression and development of advanced speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension skills at the highest level. There is continual use of all past learning as students gain confidence in authentically using the language 100% of the time. The students participate in more in-depth studies of the Hispanic and Latin-American cultures and history through research and presentation of findings and are exposed to a variety of media including authentic texts, articles, films, websites, and music. It is the goal of this class to master the advanced levels of Spanish proficiency to enable students to communicate more effectively with fluency. The honors course takes a more in-depth look at Spanish speaking authors and artists as students research the connections between works of art and writing and their impact on issues of social justice.

Mandarin I 
Mandarin I is an introductory course for students who have had no prior exposure to spoken and written Mandarin Chinese. The emphasis in this class is to develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills using both Pinyin phonetic system and Simplified Chinese characters. The course also introduces the social and cultural aspect of the language. In addition, projects and fieldtrips will be incorporated throughout the year so the students can appreciate the language in its various authentic settings.

Mandarin II
Mandarin II is a higher level course for students who have already taken Mandarin I. The emphasis in this class is to review and continue the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills using Pinyin phonetic system and Simplified Chinese characters. The course also embeds the social and cultural aspect of the language. In addition, projects and fieldtrips will be incorporated throughout the year so the students can keep appreciating and exploring the language in its various authentic settings.

Physical Education Department

Students are required to pass two years of physical education to graduate. One year of athletic credit may be earned in place of PE credit during the student’s sophomore year through participation in two UC Academy sports.

PE
(course description coming soon)

Other Electives

These classes do not meet the UC requirements, but count for high school electives credit.

Adaptation: Stories and Media
(course description coming soon)

AP Psychology
This course is approved for AP status by the College Board. Students should expect a significant amount of reading and studying. Teacher recommendation and satisfactory completion of summer homework is required for enrollment in this class. Students who pass the AP exam may earn credit for their freshman year in college.

Creative Writing
This course is an introduction to creative writing through three genres: short story, creative non-fiction, and screenwriting. This course focuses on analysis of narrative structure, criticism, and literary technique. Students will workshop their pieces with the class, thus promoting the concept of collaboration in creation of literary art.

Sociology
(course description coming soon)

Speech
In this class, students develop the skills needed to be confident and articulate speakers. Types of speaking covered in the course range from informative speaking to persuasive speaking and business presentations.

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